Hand Made Gifts, Unique Hand Crafted Home Goods, FAIR TRADE

Pair of Ebony Figures.

African - Pair of Hand Carved Ebony Wall Hangings
African - Pair of Hand Carved Ebony Wall Hangings
Item# KE1
$49.99

Product Description

Size : Man
Height: 17 ¾ inches
Width: ¼ inches
Length: 3 inches


Size : Woman
Height: 17 ¾ inches
Width: ¼ inches
Length: 3 inches


Hand Carved In Kenya.

This beautiful hand carved ebony couple is unique and beautiful; the couple is hung on the wall facing each other. These two are the perfect finishing touch to any room. Kenya’s culture exemplifies the art of adornment and decoration, and history shows that this has been a long and influential tradition. Throughout the country, there are many examples of rock art and cave painting by early man, and of similar designs and motifs carried through recent centuries.

Many Kenyan traditional societies placed great significance on decoration of both functional and ritual objects, and the body. In tribes such as the Kuria and the Samburu, this was raised to the form of high art. The Samburu place great significance on physical beauty and adornment, especially among warriors, who take great care with their physical appearance, using hair styling and ochre body painting to create an impression of great delicacy. It was this trait that earned them their name Samburu- Butterflies, given to them by other tribes.

Many Northern nomadic tribes such as the Boran, Oromo and Gabbra extensively decorate functional items, including water gourds, stools and neck pillows. The Turkana people, who live in one of Kenya’s harshest environments, still afford great care and attention to decoration of the body and objects such as ostrisch egg waterholders, wrist knives and clubs.

For the Maasai, the use of decorative beading is extremely significant, and jewellrey is used to emphasize social status and to signify stages of initiation and passage. Modern forms of art came to Kenya progressively. The art of carving was practiced throughout Kenya to produce both functional and decorative items.

The Kamba people are considered the best Kenyan carvers, and have long been known as skilled woodworkers. Carving on the coast was centred on the island of Lamu, where the local Bajun tribe is believed to have influenced Arab craftsmen to create a unique hybrid of styles.

The Kisii of Western Kenya are also well known for their carving in stone, using a locally quarried soapstone. They use a locally quarried soapstone to produce a range of carvings. The most popular items are small animals, chess pieces based on traditional African designs and more functional items such as egg cups, soap dishes, coasters and ash trays.